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Using handleSitemapRequests

The handleSitemapRequests helper function is a Next.js middleware that handles proxying sitemap requests from your WordPress site to your headless frontend.

Usage​

To use handleSitemapRequests, create a _middleware.ts file at the top of your pages directory with the following content:

src/pages/_middleware.ts
import { handleSitemapRequests } from '@faustjs/next/middleware';
import { NextRequest, NextResponse } from 'next/server';

export default async function _middleware(req: NextRequest) {
const sitemapRequest = await handleSitemapRequests(req, {
wpUrl: process.env.NEXT_PUBLIC_WORDPRESS_URL,
sitemapIndexPath: '/wp-sitemap.xml',
});

if (sitemapRequest) {
return sitemapRequest;
}

return NextResponse.next();
}

Config​

handleSitemapRequests accepts two required arguments. The first is the Next.js request object (NextRequest), which comes from the top level default export. The second is a configuration object. This configuration object accepts the following properties:

wpUrl​

type: string

Required: true

This is your WordPress URL. This is typically defined in your .env file as NEXT_PUBLIC_WORDPRESS_URL.

tip

Next.js middleware is very particular about what imports and APIs can be used. Typically we could get the wpUrl from the Faust.js config object, but it's not currently possible with the Next.js middleware constraints.

sitemapIndexPath​

type: string

Required: true

This is the relative path to the sitemap index file that exists on your WordPress site. WordPress has built-in support for sitemaps, and the default index is available at /wp-sitemap.xml:

handleSitemapRequests(req, {
sitemapIndexPath: '/wp-sitemap.xml',
});

Alternatively, you may be using a plugin to handle your sitemaps. In that case, you want to use the sitemap index path that the plugin has defined. For example, Yoast SEO creates a sitemap index file at /sitemap_index.xml:

handleSitemapRequests(req, {
sitemapIndexPath: '/sitemap_index.xml',
});

sitemapPathsToIgnore​

type: string[]

An array of pathnames to ignore when proxying sitemaps from your WordPress site.

Useful if you have URLs in your WordPress sitemap index that don't correlate to the URL structure of your headless frontend.

For example, the default WordPress sitemap index includes a sitemap for users: /wp-sitemap-users-1.xml. In most cases, your headless frontend is unlikely to have an archive for users. Ignoring this path will prevent the sitemap index from including sitemaps with URLs of user pages that do not exist.

handleSitemapRequests(req, {
sitemapPathsToIgnore: ['/wp-sitemap-users-1.xml'],
});

Additionally, you can provide a wildcard to ignore all paths that start with a certain string:

handleSitemapRequests(req, {
sitemapPathsToIgnore: ['/wp-sitemap-users-*'],
});
note

The wildcard (*) character must always be the last character in the pathname.

pages​

type: {path: string; lastmod?: string; changefreq?: string; priority?: number}[]

An array of objects that define Next.js file based pages that you would like to include in your sitemap. For example, you may have a custom page called /src/pages/about.tsx. You'd like to include this in your sitemap, so you would add it to the pages array:

handleSitemapRequests(req, {
pages: [
{
path: '/about',
},
],
});

The path property is the relative path to the page and the only required property. You can additionally specify the lastmod, changefreq and priority properties for additional configuration:

handleSitemapRequests(req, {
pages: [
{
path: '/about',
lastmod: '2020-01-01',
changefreq: 'monthly',
priority: 0.5,
},
],
});

When the pages array is provided and not empty, a sitemap is generated at /sitemap-faust-pages.xml with the provided URLs.

replaceUrls​

Type: boolean

By default, this option is set to true. When enabled, the helper function will replace your WordPress site URL with your headless frontend URL in your proxied sitemaps.

robotsTxt​

type: (sitemapUrl: string) => Promise<string>

The robotsTxt option is an async function that returns a string that will be used as the /robots.txt route for your headless frontend. The function also accepts a single argument, sitemapUrl, which can be used when defining your robots.txt content:

handleSitemapRequests(req, {
async robotsTxt(sitemapUrl) {
return `
User-agent: *
Allow: /

Sitemap: ${sitemapUrl}
`;
},
});